Gnomes Read, Write, and Think

"Yeah, I've seen those things they think are gnomes," said Ron, bent double with his head in a peony bush, "like fat little Santa Clauses with fishing rods…” -JK Rowling

Archive for the tag “realistic fiction”

Getting Ideas from Blurbs

We’ve been gathering ideas by reading the blurbs on the backs of books. It’s amazing the things that jump into your head!

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Thinking on Paper

We’ve been compiling ideas for writing realistic fiction. All students should have two separate lists of possible ideas in their notebooks now. We are starting to “think on paper” now. We choose an idea then we start writing all the ideas we have in our heads about that story possibility. We don’t worry about the ideas being “good” or “bad”. We aim for using the paper and the pencil as a thinking aid. Later, we may choose a tiny seed from these thoughts to draft a story.

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Coming Up Next: Realistic Fiction

Our next writing unit, starting late in the week of October 29, will be realistic fiction.

Goals for this unit include:

Students will explore possible ideas for plot, thinking carefully about how to craft a story that adheres to a narrative arc.

Students will increase their abilities to plan a narrative and continue to refer to the plan as they draft.

Students will use mentor texts and a knowledge of the genre of realistic fiction to inform their planning.

Students will build stamina, producing longer pieces and producing more in one sitting than before.

Students will plunge deeper into the process of revision, writing a succession of dramatically different drafts instead of just “doctoring up” one draft.  They will also work to revise as they write, instead of waiting until they have a huge draft compiled.

–adapted from A Curricular Plan for the Writing Workshop, Grade 4 by Lucy Calkins and Colleagues from the Reading and Writing Project

 

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